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Word of the Day, facts and observations on language, lookup trends, and wordplay from the editors at Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

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The 'hodag,' a mythical beast known mainly in WI and MN, is thought "outstanding in both ferocity and melancholy." https://t.co/Xx8XRbomwOThe #WordOfTheDay is 'euphony' https://t.co/40vCgCjRGp https://t.co/mnpJL2IKQ5The first time 'terrorism' was entered in the dictionary was 1840, in Noah Webster's final revision. https://t.co/Jk8R7Rz8P3'Regiment' refers to both a military unit and the act of rigidly organizing something (like, say, a 'regimen'). https://t.co/rL26PZIxuS📈 'Nationalism' is also a top lookup. It is not the same thing as 'patriotism.' https://t.co/8DqIpWkZZmWant to be a better #writer? Download @SignatureReads and @MerriamWebster's Ultimate Writing Guide for free!… https://t.co/Iv7GvMx0ee
Retweeted by Merriam-WebsterOur first recorded English use of 'ninja' is from Ian Fleming's 1964 novel 'You Only Live Twice.'… https://t.co/BkFIAKV1wTTime Traveler Spotlight: 1996 gave us 'face-palm,' 'fist bump,' and, most importantly, the movie Independence Day https://t.co/nFYFhzXvB8📈 'Spurious' is trending after a John McCain speech criticizing U.S. international leadership https://t.co/aHB45VzrczGood morning! Today's #WordOfTheDay is 'euphony' https://t.co/boOeEXDR9U https://t.co/kQtJgsOwyn
10/17
2017
@NoahWebHouse We are the walrus.Oh yes, there are Merriam-Webster totes available. https://t.co/L7SJF6G3EZ https://t.co/Yir0XMoHXJWe are watching 'spox' (short for 'spokesperson'). That is as far as we're able to comment at this time. https://t.co/jlbyaVGqEWMy go-to answer every time we're accused of Ruining English (h/t @PeterSokolowski ) Get yours today! https://t.co/0hAVEozWYG #DictionaryDay
Retweeted by Merriam-Webster'Myriad' was used solely as a noun for its first 150 years or so. Then the poets got hold of it. https://t.co/0eZ6antOtY📈 Searches for 'righteous' are up in response to a new book by that name. https://t.co/Wwp52HN2JtRest assured, we will 100% give you another chance later this week. https://t.co/mQhxORSenjAnd 'counting' is of course something a social media manager is bad at doing in the moment. https://t.co/SO5I6FM70i'Nutation' of course is oscillatory movement of the axis of a rotating body (such as the earth). But also, the act of nodding the head.We have a winner!!! https://t.co/S2mz4LegjYYes. https://t.co/29J4yDX02YNo. https://t.co/YtI6RdNERFNo. https://t.co/7jl1RbeV8TYes. https://t.co/WiDASNr36PYes. https://t.co/i6oXvvBAjxEqual amounts. https://t.co/eMME1THOOvYes. https://t.co/umwTds7Y2rNo. https://t.co/zJaIZ9woLYNo. https://t.co/AI6qvUlzm5Yes. https://t.co/Wf0cq0bSr7Yes. https://t.co/Jso4eiDC3YNo. https://t.co/ZP9JC20zkGNo. https://t.co/ymMWjm6rbAYes. https://t.co/orOUtjBI3DKnow what? Let's do a giveaway. We're thinking of a word. You ask yes/no questions to figure it out. Winner gets… https://t.co/gW6fIap9w5We know you carry love for language in your heart. This #DictionaryDay, you can carry it on the outside as well.… https://t.co/BvTfDFVfSyWriting is hard. So we teamed with @SignatureReads on this guide to help you do it anyway: https://t.co/OcimWmMkQ7For #DictionaryDay, a cake at @MerriamWebster's Springfield office. Party like a lexicographer! https://t.co/B1bhYnJwCj
Retweeted by Merriam-WebsterGood morning! Today's #WordOfTheDay is 'chary' https://t.co/6N9dkOf2VJ https://t.co/F6z3CqqXd4
10/16
2017
'Razzmatazz' is the #WordOfTheDay https://t.co/zPw4lyv1XT https://t.co/mFkdTNQ5OKThis leaf-peeping season, impress your friends with both the scenery and your vocabulary for it. https://t.co/AfcsKMZgalGood morning! Today's #WordOfTheDay is 'razzmatazz' https://t.co/PCQjEqcWCY https://t.co/aR6XHrcE7f
10/15
2017
How 'sketchy' made its way from drawings to DMs: https://t.co/Ee4EV7gzOZ'Golden ticket' may be making its grand entrance to the dictionary sometime soon. https://t.co/RCuWpScZTY https://t.co/R9P6VLaaGQGood morning! Today's #WordOfTheDay is 'palliate' https://t.co/WeVu0z0pCI https://t.co/tfVMnNRkKQ
10/14
2017
The word 'villain' was first used by landed aristocrats to describe lower-class villagers. https://t.co/BXRS92IdmBPull up a stool. Put some songs on the jukebox. Old M-W's telling stories about words again. https://t.co/NCm2zuE6jm @140xLangame That's when the crowd goes "RTJ."Run the 'gamut': show an entire range Run the 'gauntlet': endure an ordeal Run the 'gambit': jog while playing chess https://t.co/kVNXzECInmThe second 'g' in 'ginkgo' can be traced to a misspelling of the Japanese 'ginkyō.' https://t.co/dSluJcDZY4Regular coffee Acoustic guitar Scripted show Learn some retronyms from the folks who brought you 'print dictionary' https://t.co/uXidjtaHPc @Popehat https://t.co/1jCR32Pte4 @scalzi https://t.co/K7Px7ut9de @baylorgrad We like to call it the 'Merriam-Webster comma.'Although you may have already decided you despise it altogether, 'alright' is all right. https://t.co/bOyK706wc8Some may experience 'triskaidekaphobia' (fear of the number 13). Others, not so much. https://t.co/j3dxbniMUh https://t.co/4tWjoCiC91Good morning! Today's #WordOfTheDay is 'lagniappe' https://t.co/ZtdZiLZXuZ https://t.co/WXAlwP9dxcWhen you find that perfect new word to describe the gloom https://t.co/V4qG9x7ygz @FigVilleUSA Both can count it as a great-great-great grandmother.'Umbra,' the Latin word for "shade," was first used in English to mean a phantom or a ghost. https://t.co/0LGhUown7l
10/13
2017
The #WordOfTheDay is 'interdigitate' https://t.co/Rf42oLzVNW https://t.co/EdlJOEdAZlYes, we are watching 'hangry.' [goes on a snack break] https://t.co/dfW4Pzu8NDBaloney! Nuts! Oh sugar! & other things to shout when you're angry, hungry, or both. https://t.co/ZPlppCjQ6oName. That. Form of Government! https://t.co/o23QU9qPTv @dearhappyhansen Had a hunch.In case you want to look at cats but also think about hitting things. https://t.co/IiAJTq6bQSThe Latin word 'mendax' gives us 'mendacious,' meaning "likely to tell lies," and 'amend,' "to put right."… https://t.co/SVOKm9KjH3📈 'Kafkaesque' refers to something that is nightmarishly complex, bizarre, or illogical. https://t.co/4cpTzIn5Y6Good morning! Today's #WordOfTheDay is 'interdigitate' https://t.co/yMk21Bsyid https://t.co/xDSipbRqcn
10/12
2017
The introductory 'which' dates back to at least the 14th century. Which, old. https://t.co/vEKKMAXJXS'Blatherskite' is an alteration of the Scottish term 'blather skate,' and first referred to an incompetent person.… https://t.co/cMxMF1VOG0Dybbuks Snallygasters Tommy-knockers The dictionary is dark and full of terrors. https://t.co/RmeymrmOaX'Cutty Sark': 🥃 (a famous whisky) ⛵️ (a famous clipper ship) 👙 (a Scottish witch's lingerie) https://t.co/rh2shxMBrrImportant note: the past tense of 'creep out' is always 'creeped out.' https://t.co/rSXYXlT7wELiterally or metaphorically, just stay off the tracks. https://t.co/KiI5FqxlzQ'Bloviate' was popularized by Warren G. Harding. FDR liked 'iffy.' Teddy Roosevelt? 'Lunatic fringe.' https://t.co/twffxwjSQc @JackedYoTweets Huge if true. (It's not.)Good morning! Today's #WordOfTheDay is 'tendentious' https://t.co/z6KzNABLNn https://t.co/y8STQyWfVZ
10/11
2017
The 'premises' (as in, "removed from") got their name from being in the first part of a real estate contract.… https://t.co/J4lvWahzu2
10/10
2017

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