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Europe’s leading magazine of culture and ideas, published twice a month.

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Joined Twitter 3/12/09


‘The problem is that any attempt to devise a scheme that is rigorously logical inevitably diverges from the way we… https://t.co/QmyJN00lQgLovely, achingly English piece by Ian Jack on the rise and fall (and rise?) of the model railroad world in the @LRB https://t.co/Et6fT85XiK
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1/27
2021
‘The book isn’t just about the horrible things human beings are capable of doing to one another; there’s plenty of… https://t.co/2QZ4F5q3KQIn the latest episode of the LRB podcast, Andrew O’Hagan reads his review of Tabitha Lasley’s memoir ‘Sea State’ –… https://t.co/gdWZdqFhJq"Proust wrote to a physicist friend in 1921: 'How I would love to speak to you about Einstein. I do not understand… https://t.co/ZIVvke6kNP
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘The nominees’ dissembling has become entirely normalised. It is as if certain lies are no longer considered as suc… https://t.co/EMSvk0aDLwRacial capitalism and the limits of caste: timely analysis by the historian Hazel Carby in the @LRB https://t.co/zXgRsFVKD3
Retweeted by London Review of Books @bealelab @LRBbookshop @AliceGoodman17 Yes!TONIGHT! Tickets still available here: https://t.co/r1H0j7aOb6 https://t.co/hmrlOPYakV
Retweeted by London Review of BooksTONIGHT! 7 p.m. GMT / 2 p.m. EST – tickets via the link. https://t.co/ph7yJt26J6"The politics of The Lord of the Rings, in short, comprises a familiar mixture of infatuation with power with an aw… https://t.co/pu4P3sQuqX
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘He set himself subjects the way a shoemaker might, or a sculptor. Laocoön. The burghers of Calais. The thinker. Th… https://t.co/6U1zKRWYeA
Retweeted by London Review of Books“Himself no slouch when it came to work, George Steiner once asked a Soviet dissident how he got through so much. ‘… https://t.co/BJwcLObcZz
Retweeted by London Review of Books"Some say that humans domesticated wheat; others that wheat domesticated humans." Fantastic piece by @KitchenBee in… https://t.co/g5iVJ57uA4
Retweeted by London Review of BooksOn 25 Jan 1933, 16-year-old Eric Hobsbawm marched with comrades through Berlin to German Communist Party HQ. The re… https://t.co/koTGoldUFC
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1/26
2021
There's still time to join History Of Ideas Plus, our collaboration with our friends at the @LRB – read along with… https://t.co/sgyAu1iz2e
Retweeted by London Review of BooksA wonderful history about and from archives. https://t.co/DC4PmqjJ3H
Retweeted by London Review of BooksFinally got to listen to this last week & (in case you missed it) it's revelatory. https://t.co/RFxgsHGHBi
Retweeted by London Review of Books.@LRBbookshop Screen at Home is back, this time in partnership with BBC TV’s Arena, & featuring a line-up of specia… https://t.co/Gq9vkbKy4UEVENTS THIS WEEK: ❄️ Tues: Bidisha, Eley Williams and Terry Castle on Brigid Brophy https://t.co/nhkO6eahh3 🏡 Thu… https://t.co/5BaYPyuj5p
Retweeted by London Review of Books"I once​ asked a high-up man in British Rail if he could name the most frightening train journey in the UK. He didn… https://t.co/GLVO0iAdc2
Retweeted by London Review of BooksThis is a very useful article, by Colm Tóibín, for anyone who is still labouring under the misapprehension that the… https://t.co/TlDCS4emNh
Retweeted by London Review of Books“History,​ Hobsbawm once said, must base itself on evidence, not belief. His MI5 file, from 1953 onwards, is an exe… https://t.co/FeoJ5KdNrf
Retweeted by London Review of BooksReally fascinating piece in the @LRB by @NathanThrall on Israel, apartheid, and the underlying issues with the dome… https://t.co/i75my8rD29
Retweeted by London Review of BooksThere will be 12,000 job losses at Debenhams, to add to the 180,000 retail jobs lost in 2020. Town centres are in f… https://t.co/sxKkPJxUId
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘On 25 January 1933, the 16-year-old Eric Hobsbawm marched with thousands of comrades through central Berlin to the… https://t.co/fe55TWCsd6‘What has Europe ever had to do with our domestic problems? Virtually all the changes which have occurred in the UK… https://t.co/vDERKtL3bv
1/25
2021
‘I’ve tried to explain to Matt’s representatives on earth that I had Covid-19 in the middle of March, that I had a… https://t.co/FxiPHFG9tG‘My Year of Rest and Relaxation made me wonder whether Moshfegh the novelist – as opposed to Moshfegh the short-sto… https://t.co/nghGiJc7MTApropos of nothing in particular, I’ll leave you with this lovely poem about a man from the 4th century who’s trave… https://t.co/QoC53JeKVv
Retweeted by London Review of BooksA beautiful piece of writing by ⁦@ErinMaglaque⁩ about one of the great historians of the 20th century, Fernand Brau… https://t.co/hE1OjUvpDt
Retweeted by London Review of Books“Obama exemplifies what can be done by super-talented individuals in a winner-take-all world. He won & did indeed t… https://t.co/aKA7f9GddJ
Retweeted by London Review of BooksTime operates differently by the sea: as @HowToSpeakMoney wrote in the @LRB recently of 850,000 year old Neandertha… https://t.co/p8Zw3WjAfO
Retweeted by London Review of Books"Zhongyuan (‘Hungry Ghost’) Festival. Last year hell had more inhabitants than usual, as was evident from the many… https://t.co/Qo1Vi1x11F
Retweeted by London Review of Books"To say that sex work is ‘just work’ is to forget that all work – men’s work, women’s work – is never just work: it… https://t.co/rqmfHEtuVv
Retweeted by London Review of Books @LRB article on the ongoing oppression, marginalisation and exploitation of the Palestinian people in the apartheid… https://t.co/RzCjTI04Bo
Retweeted by London Review of BooksFernand Braudel took a second-hand movie camera to the archive to photograph thousands of archival documents!… https://t.co/w21E141T07
Retweeted by London Review of BooksPope Francis: company man. Fascinating, complex profile by Colm Tóibín. https://t.co/RsmnG5Piru
Retweeted by London Review of BooksReally related to this by @loubnaelamine I had all the same experiences in December when I last visited and comple… https://t.co/1MgKXAZsHm
Retweeted by London Review of BooksBeing elected pope seemed to cheer Bergoglio up immensely. Just as he had adapted to the mood of the moment by beco… https://t.co/MmFlFJW4EyTantra sees the universe as animated by divine female power; female deities predominate, from the sky-dwelling Yogi… https://t.co/t0q1mYE2GR
1/24
2021
‘While other rappers were focused on the big ticket items (major label success, luxury goods), Doom was earning a r… https://t.co/ML0eFFvrkDA complex and multi-faceted feminism was foundational to her writing right from the start. In the later Earthsea bo… https://t.co/48SusfChoU‘Lansley is a ghost of her own experience, haunting the rooms in her mind where it did and didn’t happen. She conju… https://t.co/chHRWx8dkI @bluenoser2 @TPpodcast_ Fraid not, Covid-disrupted post is just too difficult for us to be able to commit to gettin… https://t.co/ZOmx8dTQ3v @Mahaut1329 @TPpodcast_ Fraid so, Covid-disrupted post is just too difficult for us to be able to commit to getting… https://t.co/qR9QxCGeRnFor anyone watching It's a Sin I'd recommend reading this - the best piece of writing I've read on the AIDS crisis… https://t.co/tvxJQlRUXs
Retweeted by London Review of Books @internetalena you can go to 36:55 here and hear political scientist David Runciman say "Emily Dickinson is literal… https://t.co/WgkHwHd2pT
Retweeted by London Review of BooksIf you can suspend any disbelief at the ludicrousness of Catholic hierarchies and theology (as I had to) this is an… https://t.co/de5B98Hesu
Retweeted by London Review of Books"The end of the world has always been nigh. The ancient Assyrians, nearly five thousand years ago, expected it to a… https://t.co/TZMXZ5LpzE
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘The impossible is Rilke’s terrain, and the conditional or subjunctive his mood.’ Michael Hofmann on Rainer Maria… https://t.co/KfD6z9W5A9 @AndreaMurphy12 @anicegreenleaf It is indeed Naomi Frears, from the cover of our 24 October 2013 issue: https://t.co/uUROvOoS8z
1/23
2021
‘What better way to turn the eyes of the world to Greece than by dying there?’ Byron’s last birthday (22 January 1… https://t.co/GeFZps6gVCA joyful evocation of a bygone hobby enjoying a Renaissance owing to lockdown. I once got a stern glare from my g… https://t.co/P9Oxsv3uEA
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘It’s striking that in this novel, which plays with ideas of freedom, choice is presented as something close to a s… https://t.co/N4OcXhc7dXMy latest blog for the @LRB is on Topshop, Basildon, and the decline of the high street. https://t.co/w44QsUUbKK
Retweeted by London Review of Books"The future will always be more terrible and wonderful than any of us can possibly imagine... This uncertainty both… https://t.co/0XRt0F7Foc
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘Everyone claims to favour freedom, but this consensus conceals deep disagreements about its meaning and value.’ C… https://t.co/Djs3mJwjQCByron’s completing his 233rd year is an opportune moment to re-read this excellent piece by Thomas Jones https://t.co/gkfTcxTY7u
Retweeted by London Review of Books"It seems increasingly clear that we are living in a time of radical destabilisation of life on Earth which complic… https://t.co/PS6udufFC9
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘She chooses to write about those black people whose higher socioeconomic status and privilege offer them no protec… https://t.co/saqK6WBjIZ“‘I have never written a plot-driven novel,’ Le Guin said. ‘I admire plot from a vast distance, with unenvious admi… https://t.co/1IB8iOk4e9
Retweeted by London Review of BooksA short story by Fay Weldon, a writer I have enjoyed over the decades: Geoffrey and the Eskimo Child – a Gynaecolog… https://t.co/VnPkezgNTx
Retweeted by London Review of Bookshttps://t.co/zuMPywWlFe Currently rereading Hill’s great and prickly trilogy, Triumph, Speech and Orchards, and ca… https://t.co/FZO4EtlDXl
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1/22
2021
Is sovereignty a kind of freedom? @crookedfootball argues that the ideal of collective freedom from the ancient w… https://t.co/GMjKbCmbk4
Retweeted by London Review of BooksWe should have set more store by the quiet freedoms of association and exchange instead of giving them away for an… https://t.co/WRoWQreMYQ
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘It is true, apparently, that Mankiewicz sent a telegram to Ben Hecht saying: “Come at once. There are millions to… https://t.co/xJdChm5yfH‘She can determine shoe size, gait, how many pregnancies someone has had, whether they were left or right-handed. W… https://t.co/DI2EbcQOv6"When Martel asked Lepore to estimate the size of the male homosexual population of the Vatican, he said he believe… https://t.co/ZPjcv2J4Fc
Retweeted by London Review of BooksReally enjoyed this talk by @meehancrist on a question I’ve heard so many fellow millennials ponder: Is it okay to… https://t.co/k71zL20IN0
Retweeted by London Review of Bookswe didn't appreciate her enough the London Review of Books on the genius of Ursula Le Guin https://t.co/mPY3IP8ZMm
Retweeted by London Review of BooksI have a sequel essay on Lebanon in the London Review of Books blog today @LRB . https://t.co/s06FlRF7SU
Retweeted by London Review of Books"... to wish for a secular state but to turn to one’s sectarian group for protection, to believe in the law but cir… https://t.co/y3sNJDnAml
Retweeted by London Review of BooksIf you have no plans for your 'lunchbreak', why not spend it with Colin Burrow and @moonjets, in this frankly excel… https://t.co/1arcoje6ul
Retweeted by London Review of BooksThe thing is, and this is what really hurts, all the *other* species didn't get a chance to say whether they'd like… https://t.co/3UtA0oUG6f
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘This baisse was something Rilke had to work his way out of. Otherwise he was only the deserting husband, the absen… https://t.co/gF0HSzD9tS‘The legal and constitutional debates may look like a façade behind which the real sectarian politics of Lebanon ar… https://t.co/YyTx5vbZJzNEW EPISODE! Helen, David and @glgerstle gathered today before #Inauguration2021, to reflect on what lies ahead for… https://t.co/0ZICeAEz0O
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘It’s definitely our fault if the virus spreads. People are told they should stay at home even if they can’t afford… https://t.co/G0BsJUa5Yl
1/21
2021
‘Doom was a desperado, a dastardly fellow, a self-proclaimed “bastard” who rapped with an incredible urgency and a… https://t.co/CoOtWFoA3X"People too seldom write about workplaces, their own or other people’s, and hardly ever about the impact such place… https://t.co/ICrHeVh8Wl
Retweeted by London Review of BooksFantastic piece. Not in a sentimental mood. https://t.co/Ge6rOaveBk
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘Although anxiety about the court is spreading, there is little chance that major reforms – the end of life tenure,… https://t.co/sf1TwsRKBf‘The graves would yield up their dead and all would be reunited with their flesh.’ Allelujah! Writing about the La… https://t.co/w4kTdCAJQMIrish Studies PhD Scholar Rachel Andrews has written about the Final Report of the Commission of Investigation into… https://t.co/CnX9QqKSnC
Retweeted by London Review of BooksIn case you wanna read up on the new president of the USA. https://t.co/hb9bi29gw5
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘This is something very absolute. The past has folded up. There is no history.’ Allelujah! Writing about the Last… https://t.co/T2mt3PZzReRereading this @amiasrinivasan piece for a feminist reading group and FUCK ME it's SO GOOD. A beacon of what philos… https://t.co/MzfCEbyskC
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘People too seldom write about workplaces, their own or other people’s, and hardly ever about the impact such place… https://t.co/9FA6tjy33hTOMORROW NIGHT! Join us for a special event with André Aciman and Brian Dillon - online 7pm https://t.co/c63WAlA50i https://t.co/5B4TfOE7EK
Retweeted by London Review of BooksStill stand by my original analysis of the Trump era. https://t.co/d6zM73M4GC https://t.co/2Sw4uWPm4r
Retweeted by London Review of BooksAs we've noted often, listening to public health advice and taking it seriously is essential, but arbitrary, dispro… https://t.co/ihyBIdrgP1
Retweeted by London Review of BooksVery good, if profoundly disturbing, read by the inimitable @katforrester on the undercover cops https://t.co/4TmPwH7tvu
Retweeted by London Review of Books‘If the American presidential power of pardon is based on an English precedent, and permits a president to pardon h… https://t.co/CB5ZQCJ8rp‘Tantra isn’t a religion, but it profoundly transformed two major religions, Hinduism and Buddhism. It isn’t about… https://t.co/jT5xzrcabs
1/20
2021
‘You almost feel her perched on your shoulder as you read, jeering at you for wanting to enjoy fiction. “Oh, do you… https://t.co/xGWCJQORlo‘Almost casually, in the course of these sometimes stormy pages, Simenon reports that he wrote four Maigrets in six… https://t.co/897x7ecYiC"The platypus is always a big draw... As the presenting scientist showed slide after slide heavy with confusing dat… https://t.co/sZMZMoTGw8
Retweeted by London Review of Books"The relationship between Israel and the UAE is based on mutual economic and security imperatives, but there is ano… https://t.co/NWw0SlTjR8
Retweeted by London Review of BooksDavid Runciman: "there exists a very different Obama: the man of destiny. Yes, he could have been many things, but… https://t.co/zkpEsebmSO
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1/19
2021

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